Multiple Meanings: Why the Bible Means Different Things to Different People

Date/Time
Date(s) - 04/04/2020
9:00 am - 1:45 pm

Location
Rush Creek Christian Church

Categories


Multiple Meanings: Why the Bible Means Different Things to Different People
Fourteenth Fred B. Craddock Seminar on the Gospels
Saturday, April 4, 9:00 a.m. to 1:45 p.m.
Rush Creek Christian Church, Arlington
Mark Allan Powell, Professor of New Testament, Trinity Lutheran Seminary, Columbus, OH

Having taught in Africa, Russia, Estonia, Latin America, and the United States, professor Mark Allan Powell will share with us the different ways that well-known Bible stories are understood in those countries and will reflect on what this tells us about how we understand the Bible. You will learn some new things about familiar stories — and we will reflect together on how and why the Bible as “a living Word” is able to speak differently to people in different contexts. We will be touching upon matters that demand rigorous intellectual engagement, but we will do so with a popular focus. Why has the Good Samaritan parable been popular in country music? Was the prodigal son an undocumented immigrant? Who decided that the biblical magi should be called the “three wise men”? Who made them “kings”—and why? Dr. Powell will relate story after story of novel biblical interpretations that are intended to be intriguing and memorable—but, ultimately, to raise important unresolved issues for continued use of these texts as scripture.

Mark Allan Powell is Professor of New Testament at Trinity Lutheran Seminary and an internationally known biblical scholar. He is editor of the HarperCollins Bible Dictionary and author of more than 30 books on the Bible and religion, including the widely used textbook, Introducing the New Testament. He has also written in the areas of spiritual formation (Loving Jesus), stewardship (Giving To God), and homiletics (What Do They Hear?: Bridging the Gap between Pulpit and Pew). Powell’s DVDs How Lutherans Understand the Bible have received widespread use throughout the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America and were excerpted for inclusion in the Lutheran Study Bible.