Coleman Baker

Dedicated to research and public education about recovery from moral injury

Biography

Dr. Coleman Baker is the Program Manager of Brite Divinity School’s Soul Repair Center and teaches biblical studies at Texas Christian University. A native Texan, Dr. Baker is a biblical scholar whose interest includes religious identity, particularly the role of biblical texts and social memory in social identity formation. He is the author of Identity, Memory, and Narrative in Early Christianity: Peter, Paul, and Recategorization in the Book of Acts, “Social Identity Theory and Biblical Interpretation” (Biblical Theology Bulletin) and “Early Christian Identity Formation: From Ethnicity and Theology to Socio-Narrative Criticism” (Currents in Biblical Research) as well as other articles and chapters on social identity theory and the Bible. He is also the co-editor (with J. Brian Tucker) of The T&T Clark Handbook to Social Identity in the New Testament. While his work focuses on the role of biblical texts in identity formation in early Judaism and Christianity, his interests extend to identity formation in contemporary religious communities and culture.

Degrees

Ph.D., Brite Divinity School, Texas Christian University, 2010
M.Div., Logsdon Seminary, Hardin-Simmons University, 2005
B.A., Hardin-Simmons University, 1998


Courses

  • Special Topics in Religion and Culture - Biblical and Theological Perspectives on Moral Injury and Soul Repair

Books

  • Identity, Memory, and Narrative in Early Christianity: Peter, Paul, and Recategorization in the Book of Acts. Eugene, Oregon: Wipf & Stock Pickwick, 2011.
  • T&T Clark Handbook to Social Identity in the New Testament. Co-Editor with J. Brian Tucker, T&T Clark/Bloomsbury, 2014.
  • Israel and Empire: A Postcolonial History of Israel and Early Judaism. With Leo Perdue and Warren Carter, forthcoming T&T Clark/Bloomsbury.

Chapters/Sections in Larger Works

  • “Social-Scientific Criticism” in Lexham Methods Series, forthcoming from Lexham Publications.
  • “Identity” forthcoming in The Dictionary of the Bible in Ancient Media.
  • “Exegetical Perspectives on John 13:12-20” in Feasting on the Gospels, forthcoming from Westminster John Knox Press.
  • “Exegetical Perspectives on John 13:1-11” in Feasting on the Gospels, forthcoming from Westminster John Knox Press.
  • “The Narrative-Identity Model for Biblical Interpretation: The Role of Memory and Narrative in Identity Formation” forthcoming in T&T Clark Handbook to Social Identity and the New Testament. pp. 105-118.

Peer-Reviewed Articles

  • “Peter and Paul in Acts and the Construction of Early Christian Identity: A Review of Historical and Literary Approaches,” Currents in Biblical Research 11, no. 3. http://www.academia.edu/4341023/Peter_and_Paul_in_Acts_and_the_Construction_of_Early_Christian_Identity_A_Review_of_Historical_and_Literary_Approaches
  • “Social Identity Theory and Biblical Interpretation,” Biblical Theology Bulletin: Journal of Bible and Culture 42, no. 3, 129-38. www.academia.edu/1784104/Social_Identity_Theory_and_Biblical_Interpretation
  • “Early Christian Identity Formation: From Ethnicity and Theology to Socio-Narrative Criticism,” Currents in Biblical Research 9, no. 2. www.academia.edu/961616/Early_Christian_Identity_Formation_From_Ethnicity_and_Theology_to_Socio-Narrative_Criticism
  • "New Covenant, Identity: A Social-Scientific Reading of Jeremiah 31:31-34," The Bible and Critical Theory 4, no. 1. http://www.academia.edu/4341195/New_Covenant_Identity_A_Social-Scientific_Reading_of_Jeremiah_31_31-34