History

Pictorial_Bulletin_1917_Page_14Texas Christian University was founded in 1873 by two brothers, Addison and Randolph Clark, both ministers of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). In 1914 a generous gift from Mr and Mrs L. C. Brite, West Texas ranchers, funded Brite College of the Bible under a separate charter. When the charter was renewed in 1963, the name of the college was changed to Brite Divinity School. Since 1914, Brite has been a separate corporation with its own board, assets, and employees. It is affiliated with Texas Christian University.

Today Brite Divinity School is one of the premier teaching and research institutions in the Southwest. In 1998 Brite began offering a Ph.D. degree in two areas: Pastoral Theology and Pastoral Counseling and Biblical Interpretation. In addition, Brite offers several masters degrees: Master of Theological Studies, Master of Arts in Christian Service, Master of Divinity, and Master of Theology.

Accredited by the Association of Theological Schools and the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, Brite Divinity School is one of four seminaries related to the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) and the denomination’s only seminary related to a university. The Divinity School is also approved by the United Methodist Church to teach United Methodist students preparing for ordained ministry. In addition, nine denominations and one Jewish faculty member are represented on the faculty and staff.Project_History_Brite_0112

The Divinity School has some twenty faculty and administrators whose research and teaching fields cover the full range of theological disciplines. Many of the faculty have developed distinguished careers in teaching and research and are among the most recognized scholars and teachers in North America. Students at the Divinity School represent some twenty-eight different denominations and numerous ethnic and racial identities. The Divinity School considers this theological and multicultural diversity of students and faculty to be an important context for coming to a clear understanding of individual faith and practice.